The film takes us through one day in the life of eight people, from seven cities of the world. All of them use drugs but they are not defined by that, they have their unique personalities, stories, and social networks. The environment in which they live, the attitudes they face, and the health services available to them have an enormous impact on their lives. It gives a voice to those marginalised communities and shows how they engage in social activism to break stigma that shadows their days.

Length: 60 minutes
Language: English
Director: Istvan Gabor Takacs

The Safer Stroll Project is a Peer-led education and training program for street-based sex workers at Toronto’s Street Health and Regent Park Community Health Centre. It focuses on the stories of Peer Workers, and safety strategies for preventing bad dates.

Length: 20 minutes
Language: English
Director: Hugh Gibson
Producer: Hugh Gibson

The late Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society (WAHRS) president, Tracey Morrison, talks about a holistic and human rights approach to harm reduction. Tracey discusses her involvement with the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) and WAHRS. Through her personal experience as an Indigenous person who uses drugs (IPWUD), Tracey emphasizes the significance of approaching harm reduction “from the heart” — with a commitment to harm reduction values, educating others about the strength of persons who use drugs and abilities, and maintaining efforts to uphold the human rights of Indigenous persons who use drugs IPWUD.

Length: 8 minutes
Language: English
Producer: Jennifer Lavalley
Webpage: http://wahrs.ca

Harm reduction
Reducing Stigma
Hopes For The Future
Taking Care Of Each Other Screening Cut
These four videos are teaching tools to start discussion in Indigenous communities about harm reduction, substance use, and stigma from Indigenous perspectives. We were especially interested in sharing the perspective of our dearly missed friend and colleague, Tracey Morrison. At the time of filming, Tracey was the president of the Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society.

Length: 35 minutes
Language: English
Producer: Andrea Medley

In this short overdose educational film, we look at race, class, stigma, what is considered to be non-traditional opioid overdose and education in a different light.

Length: 5 minutes
Language: English
Director: Van Asher
Producer: Van Asher

SACY (Supporting and Connecting Youth) is a progressive, multi-faceted, health promotion initiative focused on substance use. It is conducted jointly by the Vancouver School Board (VSB) and Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH). SACY’s 13 Engagement staff members carry out strengths-based, evidence-informed prevention and health promotion activities throughout VSB’s 18 Secondary schools, 20+ Alternative schools and (to a degree) 90+ Elementary schools. A informational video regarding fentanyl from a harm reduction lens, this film is a response to the current opioid crisis.

Length: 5 minutes
Language: English
Producer: Art Steinmann
Website: http://www.vsb.bc.ca/sacy

A short film featuring Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society’s (WAHRS) community-based participatory research project, Talking Circles. Specifically, this film is a visual production of WAHRS’ recent publication in Social Science & Medicine, which focuses on research findings related to Indigenous peoples’ experiences accessing healthcare. The overall goal of this film is to serve as an educational tool for use by healthcare providers and medical trainees.

Length: 15 minutes
Language: English
Producer: Jennifer Lavalley
Webpage: http://wahrs.ca

The Stairs tells the story of Marty, Greg, and Roxanne — harm reduction workers in Toronto’s Regent Park struggling to maintain their newly-found stability. Told over five years of triumphs and heartbreaks, The Stairs is informed by and viewed through the lens of lived experience. Its intimate portraits defy stigmas of substance use and sex work.

Length: 95 minutes
Language: English
Director: Hugh Gibson
Producer: Hugh Gibson
Presenter: Hugh Gibson
Webpage: www.thestairsdoc.com